Reviews

Review: Foundling

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Review: Foundling

I’ll admit it, I do judge books by their covers sometimes. I flipped through a paperback copy of Foundling because the color scheme appealed to me, and the cover artwork is drawn in a style I really like. I checked for the artist’s name and found out that D. M. Cornish is the author and the artist for the cover and all of the interior illustrations.

The book jacket description of an orphan boy – named Rossamünd, and no he’s not happy about that – leaving his home of Madame Opera’s Estimable Marine Society for Foundling Boys and Girls so he can start his career as a Lamplighter sounded like an entertaining boy’s adventure. Then I found what looked like a sizable glossary in the back, with descriptions of monsters and monster-fighters (some of whom have been…altered to make them into better monster-fighters), and before I knew it I’d read the first twenty pages of the book.

Okay, Mr. Cornish, I’m officially intrigued.

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DC Rebirth: Sept 7th – Super Cyborgs, Superman’s Best Friend, Secret Identities Revealed and more

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DC Rebirth: Sept 7th – Super Cyborgs, Superman’s Best Friend, Secret Identities Revealed and more

I’m actually surprised by now that a Blue Lantern Ring hasn’t found me, as each week I sit down to read the DC Rebirth and I HOPE. Specifically, I hope it continues to be awesome – and so far each week I’ve been surprised that it is. What I’ve been enjoying the most is reading books that normally wouldn’t be on my Pull List.

This week is no different as we see characters return, identities revealed, and deep questions arise about our heroes.

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Review: Tenth of December

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Review: Tenth of December

I picked this one up because of a challenge. Or maybe it was more of a dare. My youngest sister (*waves* Hi Hannah!) read this collection first, and while she was impressed that the author had the range to write such wildly different stories – many of them in completely different genres – she also found it grim, depressing, and with a truly bleak view of humanity, and by God she wanted someone else to read it so she could have someone to talk to about it.

There are ten stories in George Saunders’s collection Tenth of December, and I tore through all ten of them in about two days. Maybe closer to a day and a half. Readers beware, these are all very dark (with an occasional moment of dark humor), but the author’s writing style flows so easily that it makes for perfect summer reading. But maybe not bedtime reading, since you might have trouble sleeping afterward.

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Review: How to Talk to Girls At Parties

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Review: How to Talk to Girls At Parties

Enn: “I don’t know what to say to girls.”

Vic: “They’re just girls. They don’t come from another planet.”

Awkward teenager Enn was already unhappy about being dragged to the local party by his confident friend Vic. He was even more uncomfortable when it turned out to be the wrong party. But Vic decided they were going to stay anyway. Because this party had lots of girls. 

Enn didn’t have a lot of experience with girls, so he was going to have to stick to Vic’s suggestion: just try talking to them.

It sounds like a regular coming-of-age story (or at least trying to survive being a teenager with one’s sanity intact). And it is, sort of. Except for the fact that the girls at this party are from much further away than either boy realizes.

If you’ve been waiting for an excuse to read something by Neil Gaiman (or if you’re like me and you’ll read anything that has his name attached to it) then you might want to pick up this graphic novel adaptation of his short story How to Talk to Girls At Parties, with artwork by the incomparable Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá.

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Review: The Last Days of New Paris

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Review: The Last Days of New Paris

…the other was a torso, jutted from the bicycle itself, its moving prow, a figurehead where handlebars should be. She was extruded from the metal. She pushed her arms backward and they curled at the ends like coral. She stretched her neck and widened her eyes.

Thibault swallowed and tried to speak, and tried again, and screamed, “It’s the Vélo!”

Just a novella this week, but that’s okay because there’s enough glorious weirdness in China Mieville’s latest work to fill a whole novel.

The story begins with the sound of gunfire. German soldiers scatter as they’re attacked by a creature in the shape of a woman merged with a bicycle. Even stranger, the reaction of the French Resistance fighters watching is less Dear God What Is That Thing, and more Look Out, It’s Another One.

The Last Days of New Paris is set in an alternate history version of Nazi-occupied Paris, where an unexplained event, the S-Blast, has somehow tapped into the soul of the Surrealism movement. Now images from works by Max Ernst, André Breton, Yves Tanguy, and hundreds more are stalking the streets, while demons called from Hell reluctantly follow the German soldiers’ orders, and the very landscape of Paris has been twisted into something impossible.

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Review: In a Dark, Dark Wood

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Review: In a Dark, Dark Wood

I wanted to do a quick review of Ruth Ware’s mystery novel partly because they were handing out free copies at San Diego Comic-Con and I want to encourage that kind of thing (seriously, getting a preview pamphlet is fun, but for a book nerd getting handed a whole free book is like winning a mini lottery.) But also because the movie by Reese Witherspoon is tentatively scheduled to come out in 2018. It’s being touted as “The Next Gone Girl” and I wanted to see how close to the mark they got.

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This week in DC Rebirth – Deadshot Batman Team Up, Zombies and a Kryptonian Werewolf?

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This week in DC Rebirth – Deadshot Batman Team Up, Zombies and a Kryptonian Werewolf?

It’s nice to be reading DC Comics again, and with Rebirth in full swing there have been plenty of choice titles to choose from. After watching the Suicide Squad movie my interest is peaked for some sub characters, in particular Deadshot, Katana, Rick Flag, and let’s not forget, Enchantress.

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