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Guest Writer

Review – Hell or High Water

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Review – Hell or High Water

By guest columnist David Leninhawk.

Hell or High Water at times feels like a film from the 1970s. It has a simple story, but that story is told with a focus on interesting and well-drawn characters and with the smallest amount of formula necessary. It is dark in tone while being bright and hot in visuals. The acting is about as superb as can be. The violence is abundant, but not gratuitous.

This is a film too smart and well-made for the modern era of American moviemaking. If it weren’t for the constant visual references to the 2008 financial crisis (a plot involving mortgages and predatory loans, constant billboards advertising payday loans and foreclosure notices), one would be forgiven for not knowing this was a modern film.

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Kathryn Adams

Binary System Podcast #71 – WTNV #102 “Love is a Shambling Thing”

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Binary System Podcast #71 – WTNV #102 “Love is a Shambling Thing”

Pretty appropriate Welcome To Night Vale title for a Valentine’s Day-themed recap, don’t you think? It’s actually the new Valentine’s Day slogan that the Night Vale City Council came up with and…what? Hang on…okay, that’s apparently not the correct slogan. The real one’s longer. Much, much longer. This may take a while.

Join the twins as they recap a WTNV episode with classic themes like romantic dinners at the exclusive Tourniquet restaurant, Classified ads (Lost: Moths. All of them.), and heartfelt demands for justice made by a five-headed dragon who’s still mourning the loss of 1/5th of her brother.  And if that’s not enough, there are also two references to punching Nazis. Because when isn’t it a good time to punch Nazis?

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Kathryn Adams

Review: Norse Mythology – by Neil Gaiman

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Review: Norse Mythology – by Neil Gaiman

Elizabeth and I are going to try something different with this review. Obviously the two of us are huge Neil Gaiman fans, and we both read his Norse Mythology pretty much on the same day that it came out. (It’s a very fast read.) Since we couldn’t decide who should write up a review, we decided to have a discussion about the book (and the myths, and various things that the book reminded us of) via instant messenger, and then post highlights of the conversation here. Click the jump for the full transcript.
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llyzabeth

All the 2017 Oscar-nominated songs in one place

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All the 2017 Oscar-nominated songs in one place

Maybe you’re trying to watch all the Oscar-nominated movies, maybe you’re not. But if there’s one category you can check off the list, it’s the Original Songs. The Best Picture movies would take over 20 hours to watch, but this one takes 20 minutes. See below for links to every song nominated for an Oscar this year, plus a few opinions of course.

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Guest Writer

Review – Florence Foster Jenkins

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Review – Florence Foster Jenkins

By guest columnist my_year_in_movies.

Admittedly, I’d decided to hate this movie well before I saw it. The concept alone was enough to make we want to peel my eyeballs. It looked twee, it looked ridiculous and when I heard Streep had received yet another oscar nomination I assumed it was because she’d just turned up and that’s generally enough.

I forced myself to watch it because I try to see all best actor/actress/picture/director Oscar nominees before the awards. And you know what? I actually really enjoyed it.

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llyzabeth

Binary System Podcast #70 – The Oscar Nominated Animated Shorts

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Binary System Podcast #70 – The Oscar Nominated Animated Shorts

This week Binary System is joined by Captain Slack (aka the official BSP photographer, aka Kathryn’s husband Nathan) and Jada Scarbrough (Georgia Peach, math wiz, and card-carrying Cumberbabe…no really, she has a card) to recap the hell out of this year’s Oscar-nominated animated shorts, because we love us some cartoons.

Nobody can quite agree on which one is the absolute best or worst (you’d think we could all agree on westerns and space golf) but we’re pretty sure which one will win.

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llyzabeth

Review – The Wild Storm #1

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Review – The Wild Storm #1

It’s been a while, but I remember reading WildC.A.T.s for a while in the 90s. It was full of women in painted-on micro-armor and men with shoulders that could block doorways. Everyone was always posing dramatically and scowling those beautiful, Jim Lee, dark-eyed glares (even when it wasn’t Jim Lee’s art, that’s what everybody was trying to do back then.)  (Well, him or Liefeld anyway.) Long tassels of hair swung around in perfectly-timed breezes, and there were leg-pouches everywhere. I thought they were pretty silly, and I was completely obsessed with them for at least six months.

I skipped the New 52 reboot of many of the Wildstorm characters, and now I’m sort of glad I did, because The Wild Storm looks to be a selective re-reboot of everything, and if the first issue’s any indication, I’m going to like it.

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Kathryn Adams

Review: The Etched City

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Review: The Etched City

My random pick for a book review this week is the lovely Steampunk story from 2004. And by lovely, I mean strange. Really strange. And by story, I mean a collection of things that happen in a roughly linear timeframe to characters who don’t really have a concrete motivation and you’re not entirely sure what happens to them by the end.

Come to think of it, this isn’t really a Steampunk book either. Gaslamp fantasy, maybe, but set on a different world where all the plants and animals are the same, so you don’t have to worry about whether or not this really meshes with history and the author didn’t have to make up any new life forms.

The Etched City is K.J. Bishop’s first (and so far only) novel. The press release compared it to the works of China Mieville; I can’t really say I agree, but it certainly is the kind of fascinating writing that I can just fall into for days at a time, even if I’m not always one hundred percent sure I know what’s going on.

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