Atlantis

Review: Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis

Posted by: |

Review: Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis

Happy New Year everyone! Let’s ring in 2017 with a review of Anne Rice’s latest installment in the Vampire Chronicles.

The previous book in this series ended with Lestat becoming the host of the ancient force that connects all vampires throughout the world. The famous Brat Prince is now Prince Lestat, linked to the spirit Amel – who the vampires learned is fully sentient and aware. Anything that harms Lestat will now harm all other vampires, so Lestat will have to bear that responsibility for the rest of his existence.

You all knew that situation wouldn’t last.

Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis introduces another race, sheds new light on the origin of the vampires, and completely alters the course of their future. After this, everything’s going to change.

Read On

Justice League Throne of Atlantis – Red Carpet Photos and Clip

Posted by: |

Justice League Throne of Atlantis – Red Carpet Photos and Clip

The new animated Justice League movie, Throne of Atlantis, was released to general audiences this week. Last week the film premiered to press and preview audiences at the Paley Center in New York and Los Angeles, with voice actors and creators meeting with fans and press alike. See below for photos from the Beverly Hills event, plus a clip from DC’s newest chapter in the Justice League animated universe. Read On

Comments Off on Atlantis: The Lost Empire

Atlantis: The Lost Empire

Posted by: |

Set in 1914, Atlantis is just the kind of movie Disney set out to make in the old days, sans songs – imagination-firing fantasy coupled with enjoyable, humorous characters, beautiful, lush visuals, and, if a few toys would be cool too, so be it. The story is pretty straightforward: plucky, underexperienced scientist haplessly lures unsavory types to magical other world, which is therefore put in danger, and adventure ensues. Nothing surprising happens in this film, but quite a bit that is beautiful and funny does. It is worthy of note that this animated feature is rated PG, not the traditional Disney G, and, thinking back, I cannot decide why. The fair maiden Kida is foxy, but so was Jasmine in Aladdin and Ariel in the Little Mermaid. Someone uses the word “nude,” is that enough to rate it PG? Is it more violent than the G-rated set can handle? It doesn’t seem so, but perhaps it is.

Atlantis is simply beautiful, hand-drawn and computer-generated imagery blending together smoothly, character’s faces interesting and attractive (their fingertips are kind of creepy, but oh well). They move like Disney characters seem not to have moved in a long time – it’s more of a visceral impression than anything, but there it is. The animation department has finally perfected that difficult hand-drawn maneuver, the camera-rotating around the moving subject, which has looked jerky even in recent films – it’s perfect here! The special FX (you know, glowing stuff, fire, lighting type animation tricks) are very cool, very high tech.

The submarine that takes our crew of characters (shallowly drawn but endlessly interesting and amusing) with their enormous crew of faceless underlings is more than a little reminiscent of the now-defunct 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea ride in the Disney parks, as well as enormously tempting for giant squid (the big glass observation dome invites a giant squid beak to pop it open for the goodies inside). Don’t get too attached to it! Other vehicles are equally groovy – you see some of them in the fast-food tie-in commercials, in the drive-through.

Bizarrely, Don Novello (you may know him as Father Guido Sarducci) makes a come-back as the munitions expert on the voyage – it is impossible not to picture him in his hat and sunglasses and mustache, but his delivery is divine. Florence Stanley is a favorite, of my companions and I as well as others who saw the film, as Mrs. Packard, the communications lady. Very very very funny, all. On the ship, M*A*S*H-like PA announcements set the tone, and the cast quickly follows. the screenplay is very tight, but does not feel rushed, despite the fact that the 93 minute film has goodly length action-only sequences. Maybe the absence of songs was what was needed to make Disney films feel less perfunctory with the story, but I can’t say I wish them gone. James Newton Howard’s score worked, in that I was caught up enough in the movie not to notice the score glaring out.

Overall, Atlantis was a nicely rendered, well-executed piece of film. I don’t know if it will excite the rabid fandom of the more princessy themed Disney films of recent years, but perhaps a few kids will get excited about anthropology and exploring as a result.

MPAA Rating PG
Release date 6/15/01
Time in minutes 93
Director Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise
Studio Walt Disney