Ben Affleck

Review: Justice League

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Review: Justice League

DC Comics fans have waited many years to see this finally happen: there is a Justice League movie. The fifth film set in the DC Movie’verse, following: Man of Steel, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Suicide Squad and Wonder Woman. All, except Wonder Woman, were met with mild applause and endless geek debate over the quality and treatment of such beloved characters. Justice League is the result of years of waiting and plagued with massive script issues, filming setbacks, a director change, and a costly fifty percent reshoot. But the filmmakers pushed on and fought against an onslaught of negativity and problems. Glad to say, after all is said and done, Justice League is a very enjoyable movie: bright, fun, filled with heart, humor and hope. If you don’t look too close, that is.

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Movie Issues: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

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Movie Issues: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

After two years of waiting Zach Snyder’s long awaited movie Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice has been released. The movie is set to break records, usher in the DC Comics Cinematic Film Universe, and after much debate we finally get to see who would win in the ultimate battle between The Dark Knight and The Man of Steel.

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Movie Issues: Gone Girl

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Movie Issues: Gone Girl

Gone Girl is David Fincher’s new film based on the novel of the same name by Gillian Flynn. The movie follows the story of Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck), whose wife, Amy (Rosamund Pike), has disappeared. He soon finds himself the most hated man in America as he is being accused of her murder which has him falling down a hole of deception, mystery, and betrayal.

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Movie Issues: Daredevil

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Movie Issues: Daredevil

It’s our second week of giving thanks to good actors who have given us really bad movies! This week was Spooky’s pick and he brought us 2003 Daredevil. Yea, you know what we’re talking about. Affleck, bad directing, pointless playground King-Fu, terrible CGI and oh shall we not forget the one song from Evanescence that was played way too much. Oh it’s a fun episode of geeky goodness! Please join us for the insanity.  Read On

Comic Issues #133 – Fight The Boredom (And Win.)

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Comic Issues #133 – Fight The Boredom (And Win.)

One of a geek’s greatest fears is being bored (it’s why we have such wonderful toys.) Podcasters hate it too, so even though we had no idea what we were going to talk about this week, we forged ahead and tried to make things interesting. And got even more goofy than usual while doing it.

Join our heroes and heroine as they ditch the format and ramble all over the place. Sure, they manage to discuss Ben Affleck as the Batman, Xbox’s upcoming games, and Guardians of the Galaxy. But they also talk about Fantasy Shark Leagues, badass spiders, fiery bees, and whether or not you can be surprised by a cannonball.

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The Town

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The Town

Full Price Feature

If you, like me, were perplexed and put off by the ads and posters for The Town (think cars full of weird, wrinkly nun figures as the only salient image), please rectify your loss and see it if you can. Star and director Ben Affleck has given us a film with a great premise and execution and a load of solid performances. The titular town is Charlestown, a neighborhood in Boston famous for producing bank robbers and thieves. Affleck plays one of these local lowlifes, rolling with a tight-knit crew that includes human powderkeg Jeremy Renner. The grungy charm of these men belies the laserlike efficiency of their bank jobs. And by bank jobs, I don’t mean that they are tellers.

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Comments Off on Dogma

Dogma

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Kevin Smith films have to me, always had a nice, fun, friendly, low-budget feel to them, so you forgive a few technical slip ups or a flat delivery or two, and enjoy the fun spirit of the film. Now, Kevin has money, star power, and some indie cred up his sleeve, and the bar is raised. Supportive as I am of Smith’s work, I feel he needs to either stay in the small, tight ensemble comedy vein, with weird and wacky characters like Jay and Silent Bob, or make the big movies it seems clear he is itching to make (see also: Mallrats).

Dogma is a very thoughtful, carefully researched and written film, and definitely his most ambitious yet, with “real stars” and special effects and massive crowd scenes. Anyone who pays attention to extras in shots will notice a lot of repeating faces and a lot of terrible extras direction. This is a mark of a production that is still being run like a little indie, but with the expectations of a big movie. The shows were sold out all day the second day it was open, so it seems to be doing fine, despite a slipshod approach. An amusing disclaimer at the beginning of the film attempts to deflect any political ire that the statements and portrayals contained wherein may stir up, but the movie does not take its subject matter lightly enough to really offend anyone. In fact, it takes a pretty pedantic and thoughtful stance, which in and of itself is not really a bad thing, but it is a little expectations-breaking.

“Before they were stars” poster boys Ben Affleck and Matt Damon twirl their way inexplicably through their roles, alternately sympathetic, pathetic, and unsympathetic. Linda Fiorentino looks like she just woke up the whole movie. Alan Rickman, definitely the high point, is pastily made up but with a drunken swagger rules the film. Chris Rock is not quite fulfilling his comedic potential, and Salma Hayek as an asexual muse is also a case of Smith underusing some serious resources. Jason Lee is a low-rent Bruce Campbell (consider that statement carefully) running about with unclear motivations and three surly hockey teens that so closely resemble today’s disenfranchised youth, it’s not clear if they are supernaturally controlled or just normal. Best stunt casting: George Carlin as a cardinal. Oh yeah, and Jay and Silent Bob again. They seem wildly out of place in this film, a running gag from Clerks that has been carried into Smith’s “new” career out of sentiment more than usefulness. Don’t get me wrong, sentiment is great, but what are these guys for, exactly?

I am sorry to say I was more titillated by the previews for GalaxyQuest, End of Days, Girl Interrupted, and Magnolia than by the film they preceded. Dogma is very interesting, and should spark discussion among people who are interested in discussing such things (though, no doubt, will just be blown off as a fluffy Life of Brian type of harmless movie with a secular audience in mind), but more likely will actually slip away into obscurity, despite being hotly anticipated for three years. It’s fine, it’s not hilarious, it’s not boring, it’s just a nice little movie about faith and the nature of living well.

Bonus cameo: Bud Cort!

MPAA Rating R-strong language, violence, crude humor ,drugs
Release date 11/12/99
Time in minutes 130
Director Kevin Smith
Studio Lions Gate