Blade Runner

Binary System Podcast #100 – One hundred episodes of randomness

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Binary System Podcast #100 – One hundred episodes of randomness

Binary System Podcast is celebrating 100 episodes! Well, not counting 20 or so recorded before we started calling them Binary System, plus some bonus episodes here and there, the odd fan art collections…you know what, it’s not important, happy one hundredth episode!

The plan was to record a retrospective of our favorite moments of the last one hundred (..or so..) episodes, starting with our favorite Night Vale episodes, our favorite Weather music, and our favorite fangirl “eeeeeee” episodes like Arrival, Sherlock, and Star Wars (plus a few “arrgh!” moments with Walking Dead.) But of course there were tangents into Blade Runner 2049, Wonder Woman, Friday the 13th the Series, American Horror Story, Saga, and Transformers, because of COURSE Transformers. 

Thanks for listening in! And if you’ve got a plan for what our next 100 episodes could be about…you’re more organized than we are!

Read On

Binary System Podcast #82 – Alice Isn’t Dead Part 2 Episode 3 “Abandoned Places”

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Binary System Podcast #82 – Alice Isn’t Dead Part 2 Episode 3 “Abandoned Places”

This week we tried to recap the latest episode of Alice Isn’t Dead, but it’s this really atmospheric episode that doesn’t do well as a recap (it’s like trying to verbally describe an excellent sunset: you kinda had to be there.)

So we gave that up and talked about Only Lovers Left Alive (and strategic side-butt), the new trailer for Bladerunner 2049 (and how Jóhann Jóhannsson is doing the music and yes to all that), the upcoming Twin Peaks season and the book The Secret History of Twin Peaks and (*pushes glasses up*) the difference between an epistolary history and an oral one. (*Grins at you over the glasses.*) Heh. We said oral.

Read On

Lost in Sci-Fi: Episode 23: Blade Runner

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Lost in Sci-Fi: Episode 23: Blade Runner

This week the team talks about AI that becomes self-aware, especially in the Blade Runner film. We talk about they hows and why within the film and how Ridley Scott visuals are still so amazing. We also talk some Disney AI, some Star Trek and say good-bye to Anton Yelchin. The young actor who’s life was taken away far too early.  Read On

Ex Machina – What is alive?

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Ex Machina – What is alive?

There are only a handful of films that I grant the title of “mind expanding,” even fewer that stand can stand the test of time. While Ex Machina certainly receives the title, I was more intrigued by the question it proposed. How do you go about testing artificial intelligence? More so, how do you determine what’s alive and what are the boundaries that holds something back from becoming human.

Now the term human doesn’t necessarily dictate the species or genome. So, more or less, what defines us as human? What characteristics would we deem as necessary to becoming such?

One of the joys of science fiction is its ability to challenge us in how we perceive a certain situation, and the whole robot uprising is a very classic genre. But what defines human nature and how do you test this?

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Pixelated Podcast Ep.029 – Blade Runner was meh

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Pixelated Podcast Ep.029 – Blade Runner was meh

I have finally watched one of the many legitimate “man movies” that I am supposed to have watched in order to have a “man card.”  Blade Runner was considered and hyped to be a great movie, as said by our friend Joe the Peacock and the rest of the Podcast cast. Well, my thoughts on it was “meh.” I’m sorry. It wasn’t any good. Listen to the podcast to hear how it all went down as well as other stuff we talked about.

Btw, this coming Monday night will be Nostalgia day on the podcast, as suggested by our awesome fan, Link. Be there for some old school fun!

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Geek Movie Reviews: Blade Runner

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blade_runner2

LOS ANGELES, NOVEMBER 2019

(Warning: Here Be Spoilers…proceed at your own risk.)
In a dystopian future in which the world is covered in pollution and humanity has started colonizing space, advances in biotechnology have brought forth a new kind of automaton. Known as Replicants, these artificial beings resemble humans in every way possible…except when it comes to emotions. Used as slave labor off world, Replicants are prohibited on Earth following a bloody mutiny that occurred off world by a group of Nexus-6 Replicants, created by the Tyrell Corporation. The Nexus-6 is considered to be the most dangerous type of Replicant, appearing identical to an adult human, as well as being better, stronger, faster (just like the Six Million Dollar Man or a bad Daft Punk song). As such, special units have been formed to “retire” any Replicant found on Earth, known as Blade Runners.

Based on Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner differs in many respects from the original novel. While both tell the story of Richard Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, a retired Blade Runner (in the original novel, he was still active and not referred to as a Blade Runner) who is tasked with finding a renegade group of Replicants (Androids/Andies in the novel) who have made it onto Earth, the film differs from the book in many respects, becoming its own work to an extent, something that in this case works in the films favor, as it gives Blade Runner its own aesthetic qualities apart from that of the novel. Read On