Douglas Adams

Valentine’s Day: Our favorite literary couples

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Valentine’s Day: Our favorite literary couples

A dual post from Kathryn and Elizabeth

When talking about great couples from sci-fi and fantasy books, there are a lot of obvious ones:  Harry and Ginny, Westley and Buttercup, Drogo and Daenerys, Katniss and Peeta (or Gale), and Bella and Edward (or Jacob), to name a few.

We decided instead of listing all the famous ones, we’d talk about some of the other sci-fi and fantasy couples from our favorite books.

(Except that Kathryn just HAD to go and include Ron and Hermione. ~ Elizabeth)

(I regret nothing! ~ Kathryn)

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The Twelve Days (Years?) of Books

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The Twelve Days (Years?) of Books

This got started when I wondered if you could do a “Twelve Days of Christmas” list with books and graphic novels. Turns out you can, if you play a little fast and loose with the rules.

Here then is a list of some of my favorite books and series, in case you were looking for a reading list for next year. And the year after that. And…well, as near as my limited math can figure, if you read six of these a year, you’re good for the next twelve years. You’re welcome.

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Review: And Another Thing

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Review: And Another Thing

Most craft give a nod, however brief and unfriendly, toward beauty. Vogon ships did not nod toward beauty. They pulled on ski masks and mugged beauty in a dark alley.

I really wanted to like And Another Thing, Eoin Colfer’s sequel to the late Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide series. In the end, however, I can only recommend it under very specific circumstances.

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Review: Mostly Harmless

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Review: Mostly Harmless

(For anybody who’s wondering, I promise I’ll eventually review a book written in the past five years, it won’t always be these decades-old books. Honest. I promise.)

Like many people I read the first four books of Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guild series and stopped there. I’d heard the fifth book, Mostly Harmless, wasn’t as good, wasn’t funny, and that I wouldn’t like the ending. And I’d loved the fourth book so much, especially the ending, so I thought “why ruin it?”

Recently, though, I met someone who seemed appalled that I’d gone twenty years and never finished the series. “You have to read it,” he said. And since he seemed so enthusiastic, I read it. So for anyone who never read the fifth book but wondered “can it really be that bad?” the answer is: no. It’s much much worse.

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