museum

Wonderspaces 2017

Posted by: |

Wonderspaces 2017

This past Saturday I headed to Mission Valley in San Diego to check out the newest Pop- Art Museum. Originally, this amazing art gallery was supposed to only be open from June till July but due to popular demand they extended their stay till August 27 2017. Be sure to check it out before it leaves/ SELLS OUT. The art museum features 17 different displays that were all really interesting to see. I got to take a lot of photos & made a video too! Enjoy!

Curious to see what I saw… Click the jump! Read On

Smithsonian Art Museum Creating “Art of Video Games” Exhibit

Posted by: |

Smithsonian Art Museum Creating “Art of Video Games” Exhibit

As many geeks have been saying for a while now (and as I’ve started earlier), video games should be considered art.  Now it appears that the general masses, or at least one of the most well-known art museums, is starting to accept that fact.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum, located in Washington, D.C., is opening an exhibit titled “The Art of Video Games” in March of 2012.  Not only are they setting up what they feel are the most artistic displays of pixelated power, but they are asking the general public to have input on what games should be displayed.

Read On

Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian

Posted by: |

The first Night at the Museum movie benefited from low expectations: Ben Stiller in a kids movie with tons of effects? Greater men than him have been felled by lesser beasts. It could have been direly stupid, but instead, it was really charming fun. A sequel? They couldn’t possibly take a recipe for condescending disaster and make it work again, could they? They could and they did! Battle of the Smithsonian has a ridiculously incredibly cast of superstar faces you know and trust for solid, sensible comedy. The museum setting squeezes a little interesting factoids in there to help the kids appreciate the mash-ups of characters, and the script is just fun. It’s really fun. It’s funny.

Stiller’s character has left his museum guarding world behind for a creepy and hollowly successful career. The false cheer of the opening scenes are dreadfully sad. Soon he finds out his old nocturnambulist friends are in trouble, so he sweeps in, and after a night of mayhem and historical hilarity, well, you know. It’s a comedy and it’s first and foremost for kids, but it’s not stupid. It’s witty and a little snarky, a little dry, and there’s plenty of pure silly. Remember laughing your elementary school butt off at the kooky broad characters of Maxwell Smart, Inspector Clouseau, Mel Brooks’ movies? Remember how after you grew up, you saw all the other stuff that was funny but flew over your four-foot high head? Well, this movie is like that.

Sequels always have to be bigger than their predecessor — going from a fusty, backward Museum of Natural History diorama fetish to the museum geeks’ Caligula orgy of nerdliness that is the Smithsonian complex — ooooh. So we have wax figures and big animals, but we also art and the aeronautics museum. The National Air & Space room we pass through by day forecasts many but not all of the delights of the upcoming evening. Battle of the Smithsonian can cut right to the sunset chase and wastes little time in getting to what we’re here for.

Hank Azaria chomps the scenery in a role so perilously close to Too Much that you instinctively, pre-emptively cringe — but this man has been in character comedy for over twenty years. You’re safe with Hank. One new face in particular was Alain Chabat, a French Algerian actor I have never seen before but whose Napoleon I loved. Amy Adams redefines spunk and sexy confidence as Amelia Earhart, a woman who makes you ashamed to begrudgingly punch a time clock just to make ends meet. Still of course wisely gets out of the way of the movie and is the befudled, solution-eluding straight man to his enormous, expanded supporting cast of comedy whiz kids.

Director Shawn Levy takes the Museum helm again. Looking him up, I realized he also directed two other movies that dripped “don’t expect too much” in their previews and still somehow delivered a better time than they deserved to. Not great — but better than they should have been. Those films were Big Fat Liar and the Pink Panther remake. I know what you’re thinking. Bear with me. First, Levy knows how to compensate for a stinky script with a strong cast. Second, he doesn’t direct the script the way it was apparently written. In the cases of these two earlier movies, this is a blessing. With the Museum franchise, he has much better (but still spotty) writers Robert Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon of Reno 911 fame. The chemistry is good with this tri0 — Levy casts and directs around any awkward script moments, and Garant and Lennon draw great characters. Win! Smithsonian wants to be frothy, but it can’t help having a little more heart and soul than you’d expect or even require. Give it a chance, it’s a fun show.

MPAA Rating PG
Release date 5/22/09
Time in minutes 105
Director Shawn Levy
Studio Twentieth-Century Fox

Comments Off on Night at the Museum

Night at the Museum

Posted by: |

You know what? There are few better antidotes to intense Oscar-wanna-be releases and treacly holiday throwaways than a fun, high-concept starring 3-4 generations of comedians. Yeah, I said it. The idea is simple but delicious: everything in a major natural history museum comes to life after dark. It’s the basis of many a well-loved story, from the Nutcracker Suite to Toy Story, only this one has a T-Rex and Huns and wild animals. We have the hapless normal person trying to insert order into the chaos, and hilarity ensues. Or at least a pleasant and consistent amusement, which these days aren’t always guarantees. I have always asked movies to do only two things: entertain me and not insult me, and Night at the Museum definitely passes the test.

Besides Ben Stiller (who really is at his best when he’s called upon to solve a crisis and/or be sympathetic), we have Owen Wilson, Steve Coogan, Robin Williams, Bill Cobbs, Dick Van Dyke, and Mickey Rooney. In the same movie! There’s someone for everyone with that combination. Williams also does his best kind of comedy, fully inhabiting a broad, confident character but also getting to use a little – just a tad – heartstrings. Not so much that he goes all Patch Adams, but enough to ground his mania. His Teddy Roosevelt was one of my favorite elements of the movie, but not in the way the marketing department planned.

Plenty of things about this movie are slipshod or overly silly – by trying to create a reason for the magical reanimation, Milan Trenc’s book (or maybe the screenplay) kind of painted the characters into a corner and stuck us with a pharaoh without a cause. However, the geriatric superstars breath life in just when needed. Good delivery and effects take this story much further than it might have gone otherwise.

Now, if you love museums like I do, you might have had that extra bonus experience of having your old-school love re-imagined and revitalized. Don’t just write this off as a neo-Jumanji. It’s hilarious (to a degree) to put Roman Legionnaires against Western Expansion, Huns against Peruvian villagers. It’s cool that the denizens of the museum really know that they are in a museum, not trapped in some delusion of their pre-collection life.

It seemed like the screenwriting team of Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon (Reno:911 most notably, which explains the otherwise inexplicable success) wrote a couple of scenes just trying to milk Ben Stiller’s and Owen Wilson’s chemistry a little. It’s a blameless motive but what I felt comprised the weakest moments in the movie.

My companion quipped, “That was great, and I think I learned something!” Now, I’m pretty sure he didn’t really mean it, but our mood was positive upon leaving. I’m not saying Night at the Museum will change your life, or even be remembered in a few months, but it’s a sweet treat today.

MPAA Rating PG
Release date 12/22/06
Time in minutes 108
Director Shawn Levy
Studio 20th Century Fox