neil gaiman

Review: How to Talk to Girls At Parties

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Review: How to Talk to Girls At Parties

Enn: “I don’t know what to say to girls.”

Vic: “They’re just girls. They don’t come from another planet.”

Awkward teenager Enn was already unhappy about being dragged to the local party by his confident friend Vic. He was even more uncomfortable when it turned out to be the wrong party. But Vic decided they were going to stay anyway. Because this party had lots of girls. 

Enn didn’t have a lot of experience with girls, so he was going to have to stick to Vic’s suggestion: just try talking to them.

It sounds like a regular coming-of-age story (or at least trying to survive being a teenager with one’s sanity intact). And it is, sort of. Except for the fact that the girls at this party are from much further away than either boy realizes.

If you’ve been waiting for an excuse to read something by Neil Gaiman (or if you’re like me and you’ll read anything that has his name attached to it) then you might want to pick up this graphic novel adaptation of his short story How to Talk to Girls At Parties, with artwork by the incomparable Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá.

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Ricky Whittle cast as Shadow Moon in “American Gods”

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Ricky Whittle cast as Shadow Moon in “American Gods”

Starz and FremantleMedia North America (FMNA) announced today that Ricky Whittle (“The 100,” “Austenland”) has been cast as Shadow Moon in the upcoming adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s acclaimed contemporary fantasy novel, American Gods. The series will begin shooting in April.

Neil Gaiman said, “I’m thrilled that Ricky has been cast as Shadow. His auditions were remarkable. The process of taking a world out of the pages of a book, and putting it onto the screen has begun. American Gods is, at its heart, a book about immigrants, and it seems perfectly appropriate that Shadow will, like so much else, be Coming to America. I’m delighted Ricky will get to embody Shadow. Now the fun starts.”

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The Best Books of 2015

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The Best Books of 2015

Whelp, it’s that time of year again. Time to look back on fifty-two weeks of book reviews and decide which ones were our favorites. Not gonna lie here, this was a tough decision. Even when ruling out anything that was published before 2015, there were still more than a dozen books that fell into the “best” category, and picking just three apiece feels unfair to the ones that didn’t make it into the top three. The solution? A ton of honorable mentions and, wherever possible, cheat.

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Review – Neil Gaiman’s Free Country: A Tale of the Children’s Crusade

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Review – Neil Gaiman’s Free Country: A Tale of the Children’s Crusade

It says here that the Vertigo Universe will never be the same again.
Of course, it was never the same before.

In 1993 and ‘94 several Vertigo writers and artists created a huge crossover event, featuring characters from six of Vertigo’s most popular titles. The result was a little confusing and unwieldy, but there were a lot of very talented people involved, and it marked the one and only time Vertigo tried a crossover that big.

More than twenty years later, Free Country: A Tale of the Childrens Crusade, by Neil Gaiman and many talented writers and artists, has finally been collected into a hardback book, but it isn’t just a reprint: an entire chapter was created to fill in some of the gaps and smooth out the storytelling.

In the end I think it’s still a little confusing, especially if you aren’t familiar with the characters, or you haven’t read about them in twenty years. But if you’re a fan of Neil Gaiman, or any of the original books (or just feeling a little nostalgic for 90s Vertigo) you should give this collection a look.

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Starz gives green light to “American Gods”

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Starz gives green light to “American Gods”

Starz has given a green light to FremantleMedia North America’s (FMNA) adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s acclaimed contemporary fantasy novel American Gods. Bryan Fuller (“Hannibal,” “Pushing Daisies,” “Heroes”) and Michael Green (“The River,” “Kings,” “Heroes”), will pen and showrun the series. Gaiman will also executive produce the series. FremantleMedia North America will produce. Start of production is dependent on casting the lead role of “Shadow Moon.”

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Review: Trigger Warning – Short Fictions and Disturbances

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Review: Trigger Warning – Short Fictions and Disturbances

I remember Icarus. He flew too close to the sun. In the stories, though, it’s worth it. Always worth it to have tried, even if you fail, even if you fall like a meteor forever. Better to have flamed in the darkness, to have inspired others, to have lived, than to have sat in the darkness, cursing the people who borrowed, but did not return, your candle.

Elizabeth and Kathryn bought this same book on the same day – to the surprise of absolutely no one – so we’ll be doing a joint review this week. It’s a twin thing.

Kathryn here. Remember last April, when I posted a review of Fragile Things and complained about the fact that it had been over eight years since Neil Gaiman (one of my favorite authors) had released a collection of short stories (one of my favorite literary formats)? You can imagine how happy I was last week to get my copy of Trigger Warning – Short Fictions and Disturbances. Neil went for a slightly grimmer tone for this book: twenty-five dark little stories of murders and obsessions, forbidden knowledge and technologies, and twisted fairy tales.

(Hey, Universe? As long as you’re granting wishes, I’d also like a pony.)

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Not your usual Christmas stories

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Not your usual Christmas stories

A very Merry Christmas to everyone who celebrates it from Kathryn and Elizabeth! And to everybody who doesn’t celebrate it, happy book-reading!

By this point most people have already read A Christmas Carol, or The Night Before Christmas, or any of a handful of great, classic Christmas stories. So we thought we’d list a few fantasy stories with a little bit of Christmas in them that aren’t usually thought of as Christmas books. Some of them are nice, and some are definitely naughty, so if you’re determined to read something Christmassy, you’ve got something other than The Grinch to curl up with.

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Review: The Graveyard Book Graphic Novel, volume 2

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Review: The Graveyard Book Graphic Novel, volume 2

The Graveyard Book volume 2 by Neil Gaiman, P. Craig Russell, and a team of fantastic artists will land in bookstores on October 7. I loved the first volume, both for the art and for how faithfully it tells the story, and I hoped the second book wouldn’t lose momentum.

No worries there. If anything, I liked this book better than the first.

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Review: The Graveyard Book Graphic Novel, volume 1

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Review: The Graveyard Book Graphic Novel, volume 1

Neil Gaiman and P. Craig Russell’s The Graveyard Book Graphic Novel: Volume One arrives in bookstores on July 29th, but I just finished reading my copy a few minutes ago. I’m a book reviewer, we have our ways. (It involves a lot of shameless begging for review copies. I regret nothing!)

It’s worth the wait. The original 2008 young adult novel has already won the Newberry Medal, the Carnegie Medal, a Hugo, and a Locus award, but that’s almost not surprising anymore; it’s a Neil Gaiman book. He’s put stories in Christmas cards that defy the imagination, the man can write.

Now the book has been re-imagined with art under P. Craig Russell’s direction, and next year we’re going to see lots of articles telling us how it’s won all these other awards, just you wait.

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