Reviews

Review: The Obelisk Gate (The Broken Earth Book 2)

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Review: The Obelisk Gate (The Broken Earth Book 2)

Father Earth did not always hate life, the lorists say. He hates because he cannot forgive the loss of his only child.

The first book of The Broken Earth series introduced us to the earthquake-prone world of Stillness, plus the orogenes who calm earthquakes, and the Fulcrum Guardians who keep the orogenes in line. It was also where we met the orogene Essun, who lost her childhood family…and then her ties to the Fulcrum, and then her new family, and then another family after that, until all she has left is her dying former lover Alabaster and the impossible task that he’s just dropped in her lap…

…right after he cracked the world in half. As bad as things were in Book 1, in Book 2 they’re about to get much worse.

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Review – Aquaman #25, art by Stjepan Sejic

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Review – Aquaman #25, art by Stjepan Sejic

I have never consistently read an Aquaman book. I’ve got nothing against the character, I just wasn’t interested in him. But I knew Dan Abnett (the writer behind….look just go look at his wiki page, dude’s written everything you like) was writing it, and I knew I should give it a look. And then I heard Stjepan Sejic (Sunstone, Switch, a freaking gorgeous deviantart page) (lightly NSFW link there) had the art, and I threw money in their direction, sight-unseen. I’m incredibly biased when it comes to Stjepan, so rather than a review, see below for a lot of incoherent hyperventilating. This issue is gorgeous.

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2017 Hugo Awards – The Novelettes

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2017 Hugo Awards – The Novelettes

Hands up, anyone who knows the difference between a novelette and a novella. Anyone? Okay, a novelette is a work of fiction that clocks in at anywhere from 7500 – 17500 words; basically it longer than a short-story but shorter than a novella. Everyone take notes because there’ll be a test later.

This year the Hugo novelette division features six very strong entries (well, five, and one that wins for humor at least), covering the range from Partly Sci-Fi to Mostly Fantasy to whatever category you want to attach to Stix Hiscock’s story. Click the jump for a brief review of the Hugo 2017 nominees for Best Novelette.

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Review: 2017 Hugo Award Finalists – The Short Stories

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Review: 2017 Hugo Award Finalists – The Short Stories

Okay, it’s time to buckle down and start trying to see how many of this year’s Hugo Nominees we can review before the awards are given on August 11. Everyone who reads this column probably knows by now that I’m really fond of short stories, so let’s start with those. Click the jump for a short (naturally, right?) review of each of the finalists for Best Short Stories.

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Preview and Review – Optimus Prime #8

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Preview and Review – Optimus Prime #8

Jazz has a chance to tell his story to the press, which is maybe not the best idea but you have to admire his principles. Jetfire gets to talk to the friend who beat him up for being a sellout, which is a slightly better idea but is still pretty dicey. And Optimus finds out that “keeping your friends close” isn’t a good idea when one of them is a murderer.

See below for preview pages and a review of Optimus Prime #8.

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Review: The Mummy

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Review: The Mummy

Since 1923 with the release of The Hunchback of Notre Dame audiences have been intrigued and delighted by The Universal Monsters: Frankenstein, Dracula, Wolf-Man, The Bride, and The Creature, etc. This summer fans once again are treated to a new version of one of the monsters’ oldest founding members: The Mummy. Along for the ride this time is superstar Tom Cruise. Together they make a pretty fun and entertaining monster movie that lays the groundwork for a whole new monster universe.

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Review: My Cousin Rachel

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Review: My Cousin Rachel

I saw the press screening of My Cousin Rachel last night and I can’t quit thinking about this movie. Based on the novel of the same name by Daphne du Maurier, the movie starts out telling us the story of a young Phillip Ashley, played by Sam Calflin. He was raised by his cousin after his parents’ death. As an adult Philip returned to his home after attending school. His cousin because ill and moved to the “sunshine” country to get away from the harsh winters of England. In Italy, he met Rachel. Rachel is beautiful, smart and not necessarily the person you think she is.

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