graphic novel

Review: Doctor Strange – Strange Origin

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Review: Doctor Strange – Strange Origin

Are you ready for the Doctor Strange movie in November? Are you? ‘CAUSE I SURE AM. 

While we wait, I decided to check out the Doctor Strange: Strange Origin graphic novel that Marvel released this month. Although when you get right down to it, 99% of this is a re-release since it’s a repackaging of Greg Pak and Emma Rios’s Doctor Strange: Season One graphic novel, with the first issue of the latest ongoing Doctor Strange comic tacked on to the end. 

The 2012 Season One storyline follows most of the usual highlights about Doctor Strange’s origin, but adds a new dimension to his relationship with the character of Wong. Traditionally portrayed as Strange’s loyal servant, Wong appears in this story as a rival student of the Ancient One, and he’s not happy about Stephen Strange being admitted as a student as well. He also doesn’t trust Strange when the two of them are roped into a quest for three powerful relics that could give their owner the power of the mystical Vishanti.

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Review: How to Talk to Girls At Parties

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Review: How to Talk to Girls At Parties

Enn: “I don’t know what to say to girls.”

Vic: “They’re just girls. They don’t come from another planet.”

Awkward teenager Enn was already unhappy about being dragged to the local party by his confident friend Vic. He was even more uncomfortable when it turned out to be the wrong party. But Vic decided they were going to stay anyway. Because this party had lots of girls. 

Enn didn’t have a lot of experience with girls, so he was going to have to stick to Vic’s suggestion: just try talking to them.

It sounds like a regular coming-of-age story (or at least trying to survive being a teenager with one’s sanity intact). And it is, sort of. Except for the fact that the girls at this party are from much further away than either boy realizes.

If you’ve been waiting for an excuse to read something by Neil Gaiman (or if you’re like me and you’ll read anything that has his name attached to it) then you might want to pick up this graphic novel adaptation of his short story How to Talk to Girls At Parties, with artwork by the incomparable Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá.

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SDCC 2016 – An Interview with Dave McKean

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SDCC 2016 – An Interview with Dave McKean

At this year’s Comic-Con I had the chance to sit down with artist and writer Dave McKean to talk about his graphic novel Black Dog: the Dreams of Paul Nash. Once I stopped hyperventilating I actually enjoyed the talk. (This is the guy who created every single cover in Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series, not to mention the director and co-writer of MirrorMask and the creator of all manners of books that I love. I was nervous, is what I’m saying.) What started out as a talk about a graphic novel ended up being a lovely conversation about art, tragedy, and music. See below for the video filmed at San Diego Comic-Con 2016.

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Review: Doctor Strange – The Way of the Weird

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Review: Doctor Strange – The Way of the Weird

Elizabeth over at Binary System Podcast has been trying to get me to read the latest Doctor Strange series almost since it first came out last October. I finally ran out of excuses when I stumbled over the gorgeous hardback graphic novel Doctor Strange – The Way of the Weird, collecting the first five issues of the series written by Jason Aaron (Star Wars, The Mighty Thor, Avengers vs. X-Men), with art by Chris Bachalo (Uncanny X-Men, plus a couple dozen other X-titles).

Don’t worry if you’re unfamiliar with the character; Aaron gives you a quick history of the surgeon-turned-Sorcerer-Surpreme on the first page, and then throws you into a gloriously insane world of magic and monsters that’s hidden from most “normal” humans.

Ever since starting his new life as a sorcerer, Doctor Strange has been operating as something of a supernatural troubleshooter, driving out magical infestations from his home in Manhattan. But there are rumors that there’s something out there worse than alien parasites or demonic nightmares. And whatever it is, it’s getting closer, right when Strange is starting to realize that the price of using magic may be a lot higher than he can pay.

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Review: Lucifer

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Review: Lucifer

I was going to rant for a bit about all the ways that the Lucifer TV series is different from the source material (originally from Neil Gaiman, and then spun off very capably by Mike Carey), but I’ve decided that’s not a very productive discussion. There’s no point to making a carbon copy of the original stories in a new format, and even if you could it wouldn’t guarantee that the results will be good. The TV show is going to have to succeed or fail on its own merits.

Besides, there are some positive things that have come out of the interest generated by the show. Like the fact that bookstores have started carrying the Lucifer graphic novels again, or Vertigo’s brand new comic book series written by Holly Black, continuing the story of the fallen angel and former ruler of Hell. So let’s talk about those, because Mike Carey’s series is one of my all-time favorites, and Holly Black’s continuation is growing on me with every issue.

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Review and Preview: Legend of Wonder Woman #1

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Review and Preview: Legend of Wonder Woman #1

The first issue of DC’s 9-issue Wonder Woman series is in stores tomorrow. In a few months we’ll finally see Wonder Woman on the big screen in Batman v Superman, and this new series is DC’s attempt to make the Wonder Woman character resonate with people the same way Bats and Supes have for years.

So how’re they doing? Click the jump for preview images and a review of Legend of Wonder Woman #1.

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