Snow White

Review: Letters To Zell

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Review: Letters To Zell

My wedding is going to be awesome. In two short weeks, I’ll walk down the aisle with a man I don’t love, flanked by friends who aren’t speaking to me, and, afterward, I’ll celebrate by killing my stepmother.

I can’t imagine why you wouldn’t want to come…

The main characters of Camille Griep’s first novel Letters to Zell would probably hear the phrase “fairytale romance” and just laugh and laugh. Cinderella’s husband doesn’t understand her, Snow White is engaged to a good friend for purely political reasons, and Sleeping Beauty married a complete jerk who’s sleeping with everyone in the realm except her. And all of that was before Rapunzel decided to chuck everything and move to Oz to raise unicorns.

Who knew that happily-ever-after would be so damn difficult to find?

Read On

Review: White as Snow

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Review: White as Snow

Tanith Lee is something of a guilty pleasure for me. I started with her – well I guess “sinful” is a pretty good description – vampire novel “Dark Dance”, and every now and then I just have to find another one of her books for more trashy fun. A couple, like Storm Lord and Days of Grass have been somewhat forgettable. Most are intricate, dark, entertaining stories. White as Snow is epic.

Part of a series created by Terri Windling, where different authors would write their own take on classic fairy tales, this book was inspired by versions of the Snow White story that are even older than the one written down by the Brothers Grimm. Most people know that the fairy tales we hear nowadays are sanitized versions of the Grimms Fairy Tales. What didn’t know before reading the introduction (don’t skip that, it’s definitely worth a read) is that the Grimms themselves cleaned up the versions they heard. In the original stories, the fathers were a lot less kind-hearted, evil didn’t always meet a bad end, and rather than a step-mother, it was usually the mother responsible for torturing her children.

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Review: Six-Gun Snow White

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Review: Six-Gun Snow White

Love is the color of blood. Love is what grown folk do to each other because the law frowns on killing…

I read the description for Six Gun Snow White on Goodreads: “…Valente transports the title’s heroine to a masterfully evoked Old West…” and thought, oh well, I’m not much of a fan of Westerns, maybe I’ll just pass on this one. And then I laughed and laughed, and bought the novella anyway. I haven’t read even one story from Catherynne Valente that I haven’t liked; I think she could write the labels on sugar packets and I’d still want to read them. And if this had been just a simple translation of the Snow White fairy tale into the Old West (substitute six-shooters for swords, outlaws for dwarves, and make everyone wear period clothing), it still would have been a fun read. But this is Valente, so the end result is much, much more complicated.

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Movie Issues: Dual Review of “Mirror Mirror”

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Movie Issues: Dual Review of “Mirror Mirror”

This is the year that easily could be called the “Year of the Fairy Tale Movie” since there are several different movies being released taking their inspiration from stories told to children to tuck them in at night. From animated family movies like Jack the Giant Killer, Dorothy of Oz, and Brave, to live-action films like Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (now pushed back to 2013) everyone’s looking to cash in on the current trend in Hollywood: sticking with what’s already familiar.

This is glaringly clear with it comes to both Snow White adaptations being released this year: first Mirror Mirror (released today) then Snow White and the Huntsman (June 1, 2012). Both Snow White films have their own spin on the old tale, and include box office draw talent alongside up-and-coming stars.  The real question is though, which will be remembered by the end of the year?

Mirror Mirror has the earlier release and the Movie Issues boys Leland and Spooky are here to drop another Dual Review, bringing two opinions for the price of a single admission.

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